Request to add new species

Discussion of things people would like to see added to the site, as well as changes to design layout. Also, help for people trying to work out technical issues. You should also report bugs, spelling mistakes here; queries and corrections to the site should also be posted here.
Mark Smith
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Re: Request to add new species

Post by Mark Smith » Thu May 22, 2014 3:11 am

WEll, I can say that the folks who operate Wikipedia's oversight on this genus of cichlids likely are just following what they have heard. Often times, Wikipedia will just say something is a certain way, without giving justification for it. All that matters for them, often times, is if you can just convince the person in charge of the particular subject at hand, to make the change. That seems to be quite abritrary for a website that seems to indicate a great deal of objective truthfulness.

I cannot begin to tell you how many times I ran into some knuckleheads that oversaw the family Cichlidae on Wikipeadia, and how they were convinced that there were only several hundred species in this family. They were likely using outdated information to justify their ignorant assumption about the family cichlidae. Over several years, whoever was in charge (and I get the impression that those in charge of a given subject matter changes periodically in Wikipedia - less stable/reliable?) did change and allow for more accurate information, but it sure took a long time.

Regarding Fishbase, I have seen them take over a year to add certain formally described species to their database, ie Lepidiolamprologus mimicus for one. Not exactly up to date.

Jools
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Re: Request to add new species

Post by Jools » Sun May 25, 2014 3:01 pm

Once you figure out the structure to the seemingly chaotic approach to updating Wikipedia, it's quite an elegant model. But it's not the kind of thing that is easy to dip in and out of unless you're a recognized expert and content creator on the given subject.

Believe it or not, there is a fair bit of research on the subject of binomial based databases and Wikipedia.

Anyway, it has its uses for understanding issues like the one we're discussing and its high search engine optimisation/ranking means it's the source most searchers will find and read - so you're right in terms of trying to get it updated!

Jools

Mark Smith
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Re: Request to add new species

Post by Mark Smith » Mon May 26, 2014 7:19 am

One very odd situation I had was when I looked up the word Oxyrhynchus. The fellow who wrote the piece claimed that the family Mormyridae posessed barbels! Can you believe that? I made the correction, and he/she repeatedly un-corrected my correction, and after several attempts, even temporarily blocked me. Not exactly what should have been expected. So again, what I said still applies. I think the person, again after a long time, did make the correction. It was just unfortunaate to run into such intense ignorant pride behind the scenes at Wikipedia.

Divemaster
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Re: Request to add new species

Post by Divemaster » Sun Aug 10, 2014 6:39 pm

1)
Scientific Name: Lepomis cyanellus
Common Names: Green Sunfish
Distribution: Most of the United States
Size: 6-8 inches (males normally upper end and females lower end)
Tank Size: minimum 36" x 12" x 12"
Water Temperature: 41-80 F (64-76 is preferable)
pH: 6.5-8.0
Diet: Omnivorous with stronger carnivorous tendencies. Feed cichlid pellets, high quality flake, brine shrimp, bloodworms.
Breeding: Once water temperatures rise to 70-75 F (normally spring) males will excavate nests is the substrate. Multiple females will them spawn with one male. The male will then be the sole protector and caretaker if the eggs and the fry until the fry are a few weeks old.

2)
Scientific Name: Etheostoma blennioides
Common Names: Greenside Darter
Distribution: Part of Midwest and part of NorthEast United States
Size: 5-6 inches
Tank Size: 20" x 10" x 12" minimum for one pair. Larger preferable.
Water Temperature: 34-78 F (62-74 F preferable)
pH: 6.8-8.0
Diet: Omnivorous. Some accept high quality flake and granuals. Brine shrimp, bloodworms, scuds, cyclops, mosquito larvae, nymphs, and LOTS of snails.
Breeding: Crevice Spawners

3)
Scientific Name: Perca flavescens
Common Names: Yellow Perch
Distribution: Mainly North Central and North East United States but they can extend a bit further south. Also found in much of Canada.
Size: 12-16 inches
Tank Size: 60" x 18" x 20" minimum for a school. Preferably larger.
Water Temperature: 34-76 F (54-74 F preferable)
pH: 6.8-8.6
Diet: Omnivorous. Feed brine shrimp, bloodworms, frozen supermarket shrimp, live minnows. They seldom accept dry foods but it is possible.
Breeding: Nearly impossible in aquaria. Females lay egg strands on aquatic vegetation or structure and males them fertilize them. No parental care is given for the eggs or fry.

That's all I feel like typing for now but expect more from me. I'm obsessed with US natives and catfish from anywhere around the world alike!
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Re: Request to add new species

Post by Jools » Mon Aug 11, 2014 3:14 pm

Data has been added for Lepomis cyanellus (great fish!), I am just adding the other species data now.

Jools

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Re: Request to add new species

Post by Divemaster » Mon Aug 11, 2014 4:08 pm

Thanks for adding them! Here's some more whenever you're ready to add them.

4)
Scientific Name: Semotilus atromaculatus
Common Names: Creek Chub
Distribution:Nearly all of Eastern and part of Western United States.
Size: Dependent on genetics and origin but anywhere from 6-12 inches at max size.
Tank Size: 36" x 12" x 12" minimum for a small school, preferably larger.
Water Temperature: 34-76 F (preferably 62-74 F)
pH: 6.5-8.0
Diet: Omnivorous. Feed Brine Shrimp, Bloodworms, Scuds, Cyclops, Daphnia, Mosquito Larvae, Pellet, and Flake.
Breeding: Spawn early Spring when water temperatures rise to at least 55 F. Males will dig pits above or below riffle in smooth water with a gravel substrate. The male will then spawn with females and fill the pit with fertilized eggs. Once a pit is full the male will then cover it with gravel and move downstream to create another pit and repeat the process multiple more times. Most times males will guard their pits but not always.

5)
Scientific Name: Notropis atherinoides
Common Names: Emerald Shiner
Distribution: Most of Midwestern United States. Also extends to south central US and a bit East and West.
Size: 3-4 inches
Tank Size: 24" x 12" x 12" for a school.
Water Temperature: 34-76 F (60-72 F preferable)
pH: 6.8-8.0 (They're plentiful in Lake Erie where pH can range from 8.4-9.0 so they're quite adaptable).
Diet: Omnivorous. Feed Flake, small pellets, brine shrimp, bloodworms, daphnia, mosquito larvae, algae wafers, and spirulina.
Breeding: Spawning occurs when water temperatures reach 72 F. Spawning occurs at night in shallow yet fairly open water over a variety of different substrates. Males will chase females in a circle with a 10-20 feet circumference. The male will then closely swim against wither the left or right side of the female and lock pectoral fins with her. The female will soon after appear to do a "rolling" motion in which the eggs are released and fertilized my the male. No parental care given towards eggs or fry.
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Jools
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Re: Request to add new species

Post by Jools » Thu Aug 14, 2014 5:29 pm

Divemaster wrote:Scientific Name: Lepomis cyanellus

Scientific Name: Perca flavescens
These two have been added with the data too.

Cheers,

Jools

christhefishes
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Re: Request to add new species

Post by christhefishes » Mon Nov 24, 2014 9:01 pm

Hi all,

Following species are not in the list :
Dormitator lebretonis
Syciopus zosterophorum
Rhinogobius leavelii
Rhinogobius duospilus
Rhinogobius rubromaculatus
Stiphodon ornatus
Stiphodon maculidorsalis
Erromyzon sinensis
Annamia normani
Allomogurnda nesolepis
Kribia species
Hypseleotris guntheri
Glossolepis pseudoincisus

Thanks for adding them

Cheers
Christian

christhefishes
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Re: Request to add new species

Post by christhefishes » Mon Nov 24, 2014 9:07 pm

Hi again,

I also have Amatitlania species Honduran Red Point from Uwe Werner.

Is it possible to add it ?

Thanks again

Cheers

Christian
Christian

Jools
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Re: Request to add new species

Post by Jools » Tue Nov 25, 2014 2:48 pm

Hmmm, some nice fishes in there. I have added...

Dormitator lebretonis
Syciopus zosterophorum as
Rhinogobius leavelii
Rhinogobius duospilus
Rhinogobius rubromaculatus
Stiphodon ornatus
Stiphodon maculidorsalis
Erromyzon sinensis
Annamia normani
Allomogurnda nesolepis
Glossolepis pseudoincisus


The seems to be some confusion around Hypseleotris guentheri, so I am checking that now.

As to the species of Kribia, are you really sure this is a new species? I have added the four existing species...

Cheers,

Jools

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